Reception

Early years Foundation Stage-

The Characteristics of Effective Learning and the Prime and Specific Areas of Learning are all interconnected.

Annual curriculum content through the Seven areas of learning:

We aim to cover these Development Matters Statements across the year through six main topics/themes. These are ‘Me and my School’, ‘Light, dark and Festivals’, ‘Castles’, ‘Growth’, ‘Transport’ and ‘Water’.

The Prime Areas of Learning

COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE

  • Listens to others one to one or in small groups, when conversation interests them- Childrenshare news and items of interest with the class and in groups. Talk partners for discussion during whole class teaching.
  • Listens to stories with increasing attention and recall- Listen to a variety of stories and poems and respond appropriately to what they have heard.
  • Joins in with repeated refrains and anticipates key events and phrases in rhymes and stories- Children join in with repeated refrains in favourite class stories; Shark in the Park, Shark in the Dark, Farmer Duck.
  • Responds to simple instructions- Following task instructions and routines of the classroom; self-registering.
  • Beginning to understand ‘why’ and ‘how’ questions.
  • Builds up vocabulary that reflects the breadth of their experiences-Introducing new language linked to each topic.
  • Uses language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences in play situations- use of a wide range of small world and role play scenes.
  • Uses past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future- Adults modelling correct spoken English.
  • Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events- Adults modelling role play scenarios.
  • They give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately, while engaged in another activity Adults modelling good listening and use of language to encourage social play.

PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Initiates conversations, attends to and takes account of what others say. Adults modelling good listening and use of language to encourage social play.
  • Can describe self in positive terms and talk about abilities- Discussion and class display about the children’s own abilities and what they would like to learn.
  • Understands that own actions affect other people- Discussion about consequences of their words and actions for themselves and others.
  • Aware of the boundaries set and of behavioural expectations in the setting- Clear and consistent rules and routines, widget symbols used as visual prompts for all children.
  • Initiates conversations, attends to and takes account of what others say- Adults modelling good listening skills.
  • Shows sensitivity to others’ views and feelings, and forms positive relationships with adults and other children.
  • Confident to try new activities and say why they like some activities more than others- Encouraging children to try a variety of activities and giving plenty of opportunities for children to talk about their likes and dislikes.
  • Confident to speak in a familiar group-Childrenshare news and items of interest with the class and in groups. Talk partners for discussionduring whole class teaching.
  • Can say when they do or don’t need help.
  • Able to adjust their behaviour to different situations, and take changes of routine in their stride- Giving children plenty of prior warning if there are to be changes to routines to enable them to assimilate it and adjust.

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Experiments with different ways of moving- Through P.E sessions in the hall and using apparatus in the outside areas, children are encouraged to try new ways of moving.
  • Handles tools, objects, construction and malleable materials safely and with increasing control- Experience of playdough, plasticine, clay and a variety of construction sets.
  • Begins to use anticlockwise movement and retrace vertical lines- Ribbon dancing to encourage anti-clockwise movement and retracing vertical lines. Use of whiteboards and a variety of writing and drawing implements to encourage this.
  • Begins to form recognisable letters Air writing and use of RML mnemonics to help with correct letter formation.Plenty of gross and fine motor skills activities.
  • Eats a healthy range of foodstuffs and understands need for variety in food- Discussions about school lunch choices and foods to keep us healthy.
  • Shows some understanding that good practices with regard to exercise, eating, sleeping and hygiene can contribute to good health – Stories about healthy eating and ways to look after our bodies. Excellent P.E lessons.
  • Shows good control and co-ordination in large and small movements- Plenty of fine and gross motor skills activities.
  • Manages own basic hygiene and personal needs successfully- Reminders for some children when engrossed in an activity to use the toilet.

The Specific Areas of Learning

LITERACY:

  • Hears and says the initial sound in words.-Parent meeting held in October to inform parents of how we teach synthetic phonics using the Ruth Miskin Literacy programme.
  • Can segment the sounds in simple words and blend them together and knows which letters represent some of them- Daily phonics teaching in October. Small group phonics, reading and writing teaching in small groups in January.
  • Looks at books independently- wide variety of fiction, poetry, non- fiction books in the classroom and outside area.
  • Knows that print carries meaning and, in English, is read from left to right and top to bottom- Use of big books and pointing sticks, modelled my the adults in the setting.
  • Links sounds to letters, naming and sounding the letters of the alphabet- RML teaching
  • Uses some clearly identifiable letters to communicate meaning, representing some sounds correctly and in sequence- Providing many opportunities in adult-initiated and adult -led activities for writing. Linking writing activities to the children’s current themes.
  • Writes own name- Plenty of opportunities for name writing, reminding children to label their work.
  • Uses phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately- RML group teaching and whole class reading activities.
  • Reads some common irregular words-Red word games and activities for children to learn these irregular words.
  • Writes own name and other things such as labels and captions- Writing opportunities in role play areas.
  • Able to read and understand simple sentences- RML group teaching.
  • Demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read- Discussionand asking inferential questions when reading to the whole class and in small groups.
  • Able to write sentences which can be read by themselves and others- Adult-initiated and self -initiated writing activities linked to the children’s current interests and current topic.
  • Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible- Phonic charts available for children to use during all writing activities. Guided writing for whole class and during RML group work.

MATHEMATICS:

  • Counts objects to 10, and beginning to count beyond 10 – Using a wide range of objects for counting.
  • Selects the correct numeral to represent 1-5, the 1-10 objects- Use of a wide range of mathematical equipment.
  • Uses the language of ‘more’ and ‘fewer’ to compare two sets of objects- Use of mathematical language.
  • Finds the total number of items in two groups by counting all of them- whole class, group maths activities.
  • Says the number that is one more than a given number- Plenty of opportunities for counting aloud forwards and backwards.
  • Beginning to use mathematical names for ‘solid’ 3D shapes and ‘flat’ 2D shapes, and mathematical terms to describe shapes- whole class, groupmaths activities.
  • Can use positional language-whole class, groupmaths activities.
  • Orders two or three objects by length or height-whole class, groupmaths activities.
  • Orders two items by weight or capacity-whole class, groupmaths activities.
  • Counts reliably with numbers from one to 20 and places them in order.
  • Using quantities and objects, they add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on and back to find the answer.
  • Says the number that is one more than a given number.
  • Solve problems involving doubling, halving and sharing- Exciting activities including cooking.

UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD:

  • Knows some of the things that make them unique, and can talk about some of the similarities and differences in relation to friends or family- Talking how special they each are and how we need to respect our differences.
  • Enjoys joining in with family customs and routines Sharing news of special family occasions. Parents coming in to share and talk about their religious customs and festivals.
  • Shows care and concern for living things and the environment- Growing broad beans, sunflower seeds and talking about caring for all living things.
  • Completes a simple programme on a computer-Use of bee-bops, cbeebies games.
  • Children talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members- During topic on ‘Growth’ children share an item of clothing they wore as a baby and bring in a photograph to show the class.
  • Recognise that a range of technology is used in home and school- Talking about how their parents use technology; iphones, ,i pads etc.
  • Can select and use technology for particular purposes- Use of bee bops, coomber, computer, interactive whiteboard.

EXPRESSIVE ARTS AND DESIGN

  • Begins to build a repertoire of songs and dances-Weekly Music sessions with Adrian. Class singing with Paul Atkins twice weekly.
  • Explores the different sounds of instruments- Provision of a wide range of musical instruments.
  • Constructs with a purpose in mind, using a variety of resources- Provision of a range of resources and construction sets.
  • Creates simple representations of events, people and objects.
  • Plays alongside other children who are engaged in the same theme- A wide range of small world and role play scenes to encourage social play.
  • They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories- Role play performance areas. Provision of a wide range of resources for children to use creatively.

Characteristics of Effective Learning

Playing and exploring

Finding out and exploring

  • Showing curiosity about objects, events and people
  • Using senses to explore the world around them
  • Engaging in open-ended activities
  • Showing particular interests

Playing with what they know

  • Pretending objects are things from their experience
  • Representing their experiences in play
  • Taking on a role in their play
  • Acting out experiences with other people

Being willing to ‘have a go’

  • Initiating activities
  • Seeking challenge
  • Showing a ‘can do’ attitude
  • Taking a risk, engaging in new experiences, and learning by trial and error

Active learning

Being involved and concentrating

  • Maintaining focus on their activity for a period of time
  • Showing high levels of energy, fascination
  • Not easily distracted
  • Paying attention to details

Keeping on trying

  • Persisting with activity when challenges occur
  • Showing a belief that more effort or a different approach will pay off
  • Bouncing back after difficulties

Enjoying achieving what they set out to do

  • Showing satisfaction in meeting their own goals
  • Being proud of how they accomplished something – not just the end result
  • Enjoying meeting challenges for their own sake rather than external rewards or praise

Creating and thinking critically

Having their own ideas

  • Thinking of ideas
  • Finding ways to solve problems
  • Finding new ways to do things

Making links

  • Making links and noticing patterns in their experience
  • Making predictions
  • Testing their ideas
  • Developing ideas of grouping, sequences, cause and effect

Choosing ways to do things

  • Planning, making decisions about how to approach a task,solve a problem and reach a goal
  • Checking how well their activities are going
  • Changing strategy as needed
  • Reviewing how well the approach worked

Educational Visits

  • Trip to Little Angel Theatre to watch a Puppet show in Spring Term.
  • Whole School trip to Highgate Woods or similar venue in Summer Term
  • Visiting animal expert in class during Summer Term.